Chris Conner-Presenting the FDD

5 05 2016

Chris Conner Franchise marketing SystemsThe Franchise Disclosure Document is a relatively complex document for most people.  Sometimes being in franchising for some period of time, it can be easy to overlook this and begin to forget that most buyers haven’t seen an FDD before and certainly the presentation of a 150 page franchise agreement isn’t helping your cause as part of presenting the value proposition to a potential franchise buyer.  In franchise sales, the FDD can either be a hindrance to the recruitment process or you can choose to use the FDD as part of your value proposition and know how to effectively present the content.

First, the Franchise Disclosure Document should be drafted according to NASAA Guidelines (http://www.nasaa.org/industry-resources/investment-advisers/franchise-registration-and-disclosure-guidelines/) and should be put together by a franchise attorney in order to present the FDD.  Once you present an FDD to a candidate, this constitutes an offer of the franchise, so it is important to make sure that you have registered in the necessary registration states prior to any presentation to a potential franchisee.  (http://www.franchiseexpo.com/resources/franchise-articles/feb-2016/franchise-sales-while-managing-the-franchise-state-requirements)

Second, get to know your FDD, the disclosure document and the details included therein.  The document offers a great deal of pertinent value to the franchise opportunity.  In particular, get to know your Item 6, Item 7 and Item 19 thoroughly in order to be able to present these items in detail.  One of the worst mistakes a franchise sales person can make during the franchise presentation is to not know the details and misquote specifics of the franchise offering or have the buyers attorney tell you what is in YOUR franchise offering.  Be fluid and detailed when presenting the FDD and able to explain each of the fees, structure and particulars included in the franchise offering.

Third, the Franchise Disclosure Document can be scary to most franchise buyers, make sure that you present this carefully before sending the agreement, otherwise you run the risk of getting a buyer who never picks up the phone again or just decides that you aren’t the right fit for them and says no to the offer entirely.  Franchise Marketing Systems has had success presenting a FDD Info Sheet along with the FDD when a client sends the document to a prospective buyer and before the FDD is sent, have a call with the candidate and explain what is being presented and how the document is laid out, make sure that they understand that the document is structured according to FTC guidelines and that there are a wide variety of required disclosures, that although important, are not necessarily specific to your franchise.  Walk the franchise candidate through the document and explain each Item enclosed in the agreement so they understand which items to focus on and how to understand what is pertinent to the agreement.  Schedule a follow-up call to review the agreement in detail and address all questions they might have.  Don’t skim through details, make sure to spend the necessary time on the agreement and make sure that you collect your receipt page from every buyer who is presented the FDD.

Finally, walk the franchise buyer through the close and help them understand how to actually execute the agreement.  With Franchise Marketing Systems, we see a significant amount of young franchisors who expect a new franchise buyer to understand what pages to sign and how to execute the agreement without any guidance.  Either load your FDD into DocuSign or another electronic signature module, or make notations on the pages that need to be executed.  Whatever route you take, make sure to make the process as easy as possible!

Franchise your business.

Advertisements




Motivating Franchisees to Succeed without Driving them into Failure.

7 04 2016

NervousIf you have started a business before that has failed, you certainly know what the feeling is like. Your rent payment seems like it comes every week and your customer’s payments get smaller in amounts and longer to collect every month. When a business is at that teetering point and will either fall into oblivion or rise through it to success, it’s easy to lose your nerve as a business owner and maybe throw in the towel on your business venture entirely. Franchisees go through this learning curve when they are working in their franchise business during the first several months of operation. Many franchisees purchased a franchise due to the fact they had never operated a business before and they wanted coaching, support and guidance that can come through a franchise model, so this sense of anxiety may be at all time highs for many new franchisees during these initial months of business.

As a franchisor, sometimes this is easy to forget and hard to relate to when coaching and mentoring new franchises to success. In fact, many franchisors make very poor coaches simply for the fact that they are wired differently than a franchisee and don’t understand the idea of being unnerved by risk. Herein lies one of the most significant issues related to new franchise growth is the franchisor’s ability to coach new franchisees through this initial ramp up phase and get them to maturity. So as a new franchisor, where the initial franchises are critical to the long term success of the franchise system, what can you do to support franchisees being more successful while maintaining that relationship?

  1. Put yourself in their shoes. They have probably not started a business before and this early venture for them can become overwhelming quickly. If you were a new entrepreneur, you’d want someone to work with you, respect your position and speak with you out of respect and concern for your success. I have found that good franchisors look to their franchisees as they would customers and they make sure they are happy and have a good experience in as many ways as possible within the franchise network.
  2. Focus on what is important to the Franchisee. Don’t spend time talking through operational, strategic or high level topics with an early franchisee who is consumed with generating revenue to cover their expenses and survive in their new business. It would be like speaking with a drowning person and explaining to them that after several years of swimming lessons, they will be able to deal with this scenario without any difficulty. The swimmer doesn’t care, they feel like they need to be saved from going under. Work with early stage franchisees with a keen eye for prioritizing elements of your discussion to focus on their concerns first. If a franchisee is having trouble generating leads, focus your support on lead generation, ask whether your recommendations worked, assess and continue.
  3. Relationships matter. So much of the early stage franchisee’s reason for investing in your franchise model was because they believed in YOU as the founder or leader of the company. If it weren’t for you, they most likely would have invested in a larger brand. They saw qualities in you that they were attracted to and pushed them to invest in your franchise. I have seen times where a franchisor who is great in pursuing the franchisee and then not so great at maintaining the relationship after the sale which really puts off the franchisee with a sense of “now you don’t care about me?” Take the extra step, put in the extra effort and spend the time on the phone, in dinners, getting to know people’s families and lives so that you can show franchisees that you care about them and their success.
  4. Know the numbers. Understand when the business should begin to cash flow and how to reference your corporate numbers and experience. Know what the benchmarks should be for ROI for the business and be able to reference your experience accurately and with specifics. A Franchisee wants facts, details and analysis of where they are as a business and what can be done to help move the business forward. Using generalities or statements like, “You need to spend about a thousand dollars a month on marketing, that should be good for your market” doesn’t help the franchisee’s confidence in themselves or the system. Come to franchisees with a detailed plan that is validated based on your experience. A good way to instill confidence in your franchisees is to use accurate numbers and detailed recommendations.

For more information on how to franchise your business, contact Franchise Marketing Systems:

info@FranchiseMarketingSystems.com





IFA Conference 2016

23 02 2016

The IFA Conference 2016 – San Antonio, TX

San Antonio IFA, Christopher Conner, Franchise Marketing Systems, Franchise Exposition

The conference yet again attracted large crowds of enthusiastic franchise professionals and industry experts from around the world.  The convention was held at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center and attracted many of the world’s best in franchising.  Last year in Las Vegas, attendance numbered 3,880 and over 330 booths, this year in San Antonio was expected to be significantly larger.  Some of the shows premium sponsors included PepsiCo, Berlitz, Franconnect, Menchie’s, BDO and other industry advocates.

https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/FRANCHISE/4ea56050-5ed6-4b77-8200-af13b46f4919/UploadedFiles/ConvFacts_2016.pdf

The conference kicked off with an amazing presentation by Stanley McChrystal, the Former U.S. General.  Stan McChrystal commenced the general session with a presentation focused on leadership, team development and our evolving business landscape.   Sheryl Connely with Ford Motor Company presented on business trends, the globalization of today’s business environment and overall consumer trends. 

Speakers: http://convention.franchise.org/scheduleprogram/keynotespeakers

The Conference offered a wide variety of mini-super sessions which were full of valuable content and great speakers.  One presenter which left a strong impression  was  Walter Bond who as a former NBA player, presented on Franchise Harmony:  Keys to Building A Strong System Positioned For Explosive Growth, his relating business and franchising to his sports career was entertaining and relevant.

FranPAC (Franchising’s Political Action Committee) was involved in the conference and their presence was felt throughout the meetings and convention hall.  All involved in the franchise industry are aware and interested in the ongoing joint employer negotiations taking place in Washington.  (http://www.franchise.org/franpac)

The franchise round tables were as always a hit and seem to provide some of the most immediate value for franchisors and franchise professionals in attendance.  Tables seat 10-12 people and are lead by panelists to keep the discussion open and productive.  Topics included sales, operations, strategy, training and other core elements of franchise management.  Franchise brands with hundreds of locations shared ideas from a mature brand’s perspective and newer franchisors discussed pertinent issues for start up brands.  All together, the feedback for roundtable sessions was again over the top.

 

 

 





Why do some franchise brands take off?

21 02 2016

how to franchise

It is always incredible to see a new brand hit the market and in a short time period take over an area or industry segment.  It almost seems effortless for some franchise systems that get a foot hold in a market and establish themselves over night.  Why is it that some franchises catch hold so quickly and others just don’t get momentum?

First it seems to be driven by a competitive differentiator that others in an industry space just don’t have.  Creamistry, an ice cream brand, delivers ice cream products to customers with a proprietary liquid nitrogen system and creates an experience for the customer, Jimmy Johns used aggressive marketing and a hard push to millennials and younger generations to compete with the sub sandwich market and systems like Hampton Inn offered value and professionalism at a price point not seen in the hotel franchise segment while Restoration 1 utilized a unique marketing and sales model to generate business in the restoration franchise field.  All of these brands set a new norm for their market segment and created a competitive advantage for their franchise. 

These high growth franchise brands committed to marketing and branding.  They look, feel, smell and exude professionalism in all of their marketing and branding.  The website looks great, brochures are high quality and signage is sharp.  When you see a brand that is on fire, you recognize it immediately and with only a glance they create an impact on you.  Investment in branding and then in the franchise marketing plan take these businesses forward quickly in the franchise market.  

Great operating models are inherent in any systems ability to scale and grow into new markets.  Quick moving franchises have solid unit level economics and deliver a consistent customer experience in their locations.  The product looks, feels and tastes the same whether you are in San Antonio or Los Angeles.  Operators and employees are running the business to a solid set of operating protocols and are enthusiastic to be part of the brand.   Company culture is apparent in not only corporate stores but also throughout the franchises locations.  

All together, great franchise brands come from all industry segments and areas of the world.  It seems to take a leader with vision, the aptitude for growth and a willingness to sacrifice short term profit for long term gain.

Contact us if you’ve ever thought about franchising your business; Chris.conner@fmsfranchise.com





Chris Conner: Franchise Development

26 01 2016

The art of franchise development is one that takes time and effort to define.  Good franchises are composed of strong systems, dedicated marketing models, great training platforms and good brands.  Most importantly they always include solid leadership who understand the value of scaling a business.

Christopher Conner has spent almost over 12 years in the franchise consulting field working with small businesses to expand and grow their concepts through franchising and has truly seen the good, bad and ugly in the franchise process.  What is it about franchising that brings out the worst in some business owners?  We read about the lawsuits, angry franchise owners, online rants about some conflict between franchisors and franchisees along with a myriad of other issues that seem to stem from the franchise expansion process.  The fact is that some business owners just aren’t made for franchising.

http://www.franchisemarketingsystems.com/our-team/christopher-james-conner-president-franchise-development/

In Mr. Conner’s experience and time with several hundred different business owners transitioning into the franchise model, there have been some evident truths to the process which have become apparent.

  1. Franchisors need to be patient….and some business owners just don’t have the time or ability to wait.
  2. Business owners who wish to franchise a business need to be long-term, value-oriented professionals.  The franchise business is all about seeing where the voyage is headed, not focused on the mile markers along the way.
  3. Franchising requires strong relationship skills, a good franchisor knows how to get people to like them and then keep that relationship past the sale.
  4. Great franchisors are always looking for ways to add value to the franchise relationship and will continue to invest in the long term vision for the overall business.
  5. Business owners who “Get It” understand that the profitability you make from one or two businesses doesn’t add up to much when compared with the potential for true scale through franchising.




Safari Run Franchise on Blog Talk Radio

5 07 2010

Safari Run on Blog Talk!

Join us for a blog talk radio program on the Safari Run franchise. Christopher James Connor will be on the program with host, Paul Vann.

Safari Run is a unique, cutting edge business that is designed to provide children with a fun, intertaining place where they can learn about nutrition, fitness, and healthy life styles.

Click on the link below to log into our radio program!

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/paullawrencevann/2010/07/08/franchise-marketing-systems-christopher-conner-dis





Franchise Marketing Systems is Growing

30 06 2010

With the Addition of James Conner to the FMS team, the consulting operation has added an experienced business person with over 30 years of experience in International business work. James Conner is based out of Chicago, IL and brings an MBA from Thunderbird School of Business in Arizona.